About Us

Vision & Mission

Mental Health America of Hendricks County is a non-profit, United Way community partner, established in 1953.

Our mission is to promote mental wellness in Hendricks County, Indiana through information and referral, education, individual advocacy, and support; linking those in need with appropriate mental health services.  We believe strongly in providing these services in a caring, compassionate, culturally competent and confidential manner.

Our vision is for Hendricks County to be a community that values and enjoys mental well-being and which empowers its members to treat one another with dignity and mutual respect.


Board of Directors

MHAHC President
Brenda Graves-Croom
Family and Social Services Administration

Vice President
Becky Maners
TKO Graphix

Secretary
Jeff Peabody
Barnes & Thornburg, LLP

Treasurer
Darci James
Darci James Photography

Members

Aaron Garner
Tetra Prime Consulting

Amy Mace
Cummins Behavioral Health Services

Carly Cole
Summit Planners Inc.

Dewanna Mooneyham
American Family Insurance

Jenny Bates
Capital Industries

Mary Ann Abramson
Interlocal Association, WorkOne Partner

 


Staff

Executive Director
Tamara Jessup
director@mhahc.com

Administrative Assistant & Volunteer Coordinator
Deana Carter 
admin@mhahc.com

Youth Educator
Sandy Brown
mhahc.ed@gmail.com


Community Collaborators

We're in this together - MHAHC could not do everything that we do without collaborating with many great organizations and agencies throughout the county. These organizations include the following:


The Mental Health America Bell

"Cast from shackles which bound them, this bell shall ring out hope for the mentally ill and victory over mental illness."

During the early days of mental health treatment, asylums often restrained persons with mental illnesses with iron chains and shackles around their ankles and wrists. Because of better understanding and treatments, this cruel practice eventually stopped.

In the early 1950s, the National Mental Health Association, now Mental Health America, issued a call to asylums across the country for their discarded chains and shackles. On April 13, 1953, at the McShane Bell Foundry in Baltimore, MD, MHA melted down these inhumane bindings and recast them into a sign of hope: the Mental Health Bell.

Now the symbol of Mental Health America, the 300-pound Bell serves as a powerful reminder that the invisible chains of misunderstanding and discrimination continue to bind people with mental illnesses. Today, the Mental Health Bell rings out hope for improving mental health and achieving victory over mental illnesses.

Over the years, national mental health leaders and other prominent individuals have rung the Bell to mark the continued progress in the fight for victory over mental illnesses and addictive disorders.

MHAHC acquired a replica of the MHA Bell from the former MHA of Greater Indianapolis. We are proud to display the Bell at our office as a symbol of all that we stand for. The Bell rings as a reminder of what came before and rings out hope for victory over mental illness.

>